Category Archives: Ellen Weber

Best 50 Blogs of the Year – with Thanks!

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Honored to  rank  in the 50 Best Leadership Blogs of 2013. Thanks to the generous research by Dr. Jon Warner – we are supported, encouraged and blessed by this kind recognition. Many good friends  and colleagues here in this list, remind us daily to keep on creating and to join… Read more »

Learn More with Neural Tools!

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Check out game-changer tools for teachers, parents and teens!

Enter the new era, with tools that build relevant skills for high-performance minds!

Learn with New Neuro Tools!

Find FREE Products to Discover Your Hidden or Unused Talents!

50 Questions to Lead Bloggers

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Leadership is changing fast and if ASTD is right in 2012 Leadership Handbook – a new kind of leader is already on the horizon! Could any of the new era leaders listed below help to usher in that finer future we all crave?

Play Your Way to Understand

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Leaders say learners don’t understand new ideas. Learners say leaders rarely offer new ideas. I say that play packs the punch to boost brainpower for a new innovation era. That’s why you’ll want to check back soon for the debut of FUNUDERSTAND – an Online simulation game based on play.

10 Questions from Problems to Playful Solutions

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What’s the solution? An online game!

What’s the problem? Mentoring is too one-way, as it currently rolls out. Older mentors dictate practices to upstarts even when upstarts have far more valued skills to teach. It hurts entire organizations as it keeps poor practices alive, and blocks leadership opportunities for enthusiastic young experts in any field.

Advance with a New Mantra

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How could a shift of focus escalate your talents?

Breathtaking views – visible only from top vantage points – inspired this Russian climber to reach past his own health problem, and his country’s economic setbacks.

Dupri speaks of the sheer bliss in reaching new peaks:

I recently climbed to the top of the statue of Peter the Great in the center of the city one night — 100 meters (330 feet) up and onto his head. We climbed up while the guards were sleeping. A weather vane was spinning in the wind on the very top. Below, the sun was slowly rising over Moscow. The city was asleep, and it was like life was frozen. I was the happiest person on Earth. I only need to look down to forget all my problems.

You too could tower over an unforgettable adventure – taking inspiration from its magnificent panoramic view of the next incredible leg of your journey.

The choice you make may seem as simple as daily options go. Or you could choose to capitalize on teachable moments as Rodney King did in LA riots back in 1992.

Making Change Easy

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Change often feels anything but easy …

Ever ask with that popular poster, How can you fly with eagles when you work with a bunch of turkeys?

It feels as if your brain is hard-wired more for chipping away at endless daily routines that tank your talents. You suit up to lead lofty adventures, yet too often ruts keep you pecking away like turkeys, day after day. Do you ever wonder why you slide back so easily into doing the same boring things that spin your wheels but go nowhere? It may seem reasonable once or twice. But over and over again?

Some people blame their supervisors, others say lack of funds keeps them down in the dust.

Are you aware though, that blame robs creative oomph, drowns change and leaves you stuck in ruts? Fault finding blocks focus from seeing those game-changing horizons that complainers only crave.

It doesn’t have to be that way, and your success often depends on how you handle detractors. When Gordon, a British Columbia School Superintendent, tried to involve parents in the daily interactions of his large district, several secondary school faculty threatened to quit.

Cynicism trumped his changes at every step …

Protesters insisted that when outsiders (namely parents) try to control their classrooms, they can no longer teach effectively and test scores suffer. Critics countered even small suggestions to include parents, with anxious retorts that parents know nothing about secondary school content, yet act as if they’re in charge.

For months Gordon tried to win over detractors, while a vocal few spread cynicism across schools averting any progress toward collaboration. Nothing worked and gloom spread across change suggestions like the aftermath of nuclear fallout spreads across a once-vibrant village.

Allies opened spigots of hope …

Then Gordon called a meeting with four highly-respected teachers.

After a few hours of brainstorming they’d integrated four disciplines under one umbrella topic – LIGHT. Each of the four classes met learning standards and yet lessons also included student-led topics that teens enjoy.

Enthusiasm carried that first meeting into shared pizza and late night noodling ….